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Full text of "Practical Organic Chemistry"

ETHYL ALCOHOL

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49

addition of paraffin i.e., it should give a clear solution with
water. It is, however, preferable to use rectified spirits 60-70
over-proof which can be bought free of duty by teaching institu-
tions on application to the Inland Revenue Board.

Methylated spirit contains, in addition to ethyl and methyl
alcohols, water, fusel-oil, acetalde-
hyde, and acetone. It may be
freed from aldehyde by boiling
with 2—3 per cent, solid caustic
potash on the water-bath with an
upright condenser for one hour, or
if larger quantities are employed,
a tin bottle is preferable, which
is heated directly over a small
flame (see Fig. 38). It is then
distilled with the apparatus shown
in Fig. 39. The bottle is here
surmounted with a T-piece hold-
ing a thermometer. The distil-
lation is stopped when most of the
spirit has distilled and the ther-
mometer indicates 80°. A further
purification may be effected by
adding a little powdered perman-
ganate of potash and by a second
distillation, but this is rarely ne-
cessary. The same method of
purification may be applied to
over-proof spirit, which will hence-
forth be called spirit as distinguished from the purified product
or absolute alcohol.

Ethyl Alcohol, C2H5.OH

«

Commercial absolute alcohol may be used for the preparations
which follow. It is obtained by distilling crude spirits of wine
over quicklime, and usually contains about 0-5 per cent of
water.

Properties.—Pure ethyl alcohol boils at 78-3°, and has a
sp. gr. of 0793 at I5°- It mixes with water in all'proportions

COHEN'S ADV. p.o.c.                                              E

FIG. 38.

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